EPISODE 120 INTERVIEW WITH MARYANN LOMBARDI: ENTREPRENEURSHIP IS A MINDSET AND AN ACTION

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EPISODE 120 INTERVIEW WITH MARYANN LOMBARDI: ENTREPRENEURSHIP IS A MINDSET AND AN ACTION

entrepreneurship is a mindset and an action

Personal narratives are important.  What you tell yourself about who you are, can define what you think you’re capable of doing.  My awesome guest today, Maryann Lombardi, is a business coach who strives to help her clients figure out who they are first, knowing that this clarity is key to them finding their own confidence.  Maryann has built a great business, with a specific niche, and I’m excited for you to hear her story.

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Transcript

Erin Marcus:

Hi! I’m Erin Marcus, former corporate executive turned entrepreneur and founder and CEO of Conquer Your Business. Welcome to the Ready Yet?! Podcast. We’re excited to bring you more than a hundred episodes of interviews and insights designed to help entrepreneurs get the financial and emotional freedom they need in order to build a business and a life they’re proud of.

Welcome, welcome to this episode of the Ready Yet?! Podcast. I am very excited for my conversation today because my friend, but it’s like more than that, right? Today’s guest, we’ll just put it this way, today’s guest, Maryann Lombardi and I are in the same marketing program. So, I don’t just know you as a human, but I’ve watched your journey this year as you’ve grown your business. You’ve watched my journey as I’ve grown my business, and I think there’s just like a partner in arms that you start to feel when you watch the ups and downs of the entrepreneurial world. So, so excited to have more of a conversation with you and share what I know about you and your story and what you do, and then learn some more origin story background as well. So, with that, before we get into the nuts and bolts, why don’t you give a little bit of a more formal introduction of who you are and what you do?

 

Maryann Lombardi:

Yeah, absolutely, Erin. I’m thrilled to be here. Thanks so much for the invite. And you’re absolutely right, there is something so necessary as entrepreneurs about having a community of people around you to help support you professionally, but also personally. So, I’m happy that we’re in that mix together. I’m Maryann Lombardi. I’m the founder and CEO of Maryann Lombardi Coaching, and I work with women and non-binary entrepreneurs, really helping them build wealth and independence so they can ditch that work-life balance lie because let me tell you, people work-life balance is a lie and build profitable businesses that are in alignment with the lives that they choose to live. So that’s my passion from a professional level. I’m also a mom. I am a fur baby parent too. I’ve got two of those guys. I’m a taco lover. I like wine, Spanish wine, which is really great. 

 

Erin Marcus:

Nice. So, I have questions. I’m sure you’re tracked. I have questions. I love what you focus on because I think there are certain sections of the population that because of just who they are, have an additional level of complexity with the chaos that we all have to sort through, right? The human experience of trying to become an entrepreneur is hard. Listening to all the stories of what society tells you you’re supposed to do versus what you think you’re supposed to do, all the self-worth, like all of the things that entrepreneurs go through, it’s already hard. And now, when you add on top of that any kind of self-definition that creates a level of complexity, creates a level of fear, creates a level of confusion. However, the challenges of growing up through like teenagers, it’s bad enough for those of us who didn’t have those complexities, right? I think there is a need for that niche.

 

Maryann Lombardi:

Yeah, I would agree with that. I mean, I think that, to your point, we are all a product of our conditioning, of our circumstances and expectations and the expectations of us. So, we come into whatever world that we are existing in from a work-life perspective with all those circumstances and expectations. And in many ways, yes, being an entrepreneur is challenging, but I find that the entrepreneurial space actually allows you to cut through those expectations and circumstances in a way that is much more–well, much easier, right? And much more rewarding because I feel often in a corporate environment and environments where not only do you come with the expectations on you, but then you have to exist within a system that is not really meant for you, especially if you are a woman, especially if you are gender nonconforming, if you are from a marginalized community, all of that kind of stuff. Because the corporate and traditional business environment really is built for a white male model. So, yeah.

 

Erin Marcus:

Well, and the way that I describe what you’re talking about is in corporate, and you don’t even have to come from the aspect of judging it as bad, right? It just is. It just is. But the truth of the matter is having been through it, you’re rewarded at your job by performing a given way in a given way, in a narrowly defined space with a very specific set of circumstances.

 

Maryann Lombardi:

Yeah. And it’s very hard to get out of those things, right? Like, and if you–

 

Erin Marcus:

I was good at not conforming. I mean, I think it’s a lack of an attention span. This is what it is. I don’t control it real well, but the truth of the matter is, I do look back going, Okay, as much as I was allowed to let my free flag fly, to some extent, my only challenge was being female.

 

Maryann Lombardi:

Yeah. Well, and here’s the thing, like you can find environments where you can be yourself, right? It doesn’t mean that those things don’t exist, but it requires you to one, know who the heck you are, first of all, which is its own thing. And it also requires you to understand how to look at a work environment, look at a space, and determine whether this is a place that is safe for you to be who you are and has the promotion opportunities, has the growth opportunities, has all of that kind of stuff to do, and not everybody knows or can, you know, do that kind of thing.

 

Erin Marcus:

Right. I consider myself so amazingly grateful for the mentorship I had in my corporate life because I was given so much opportunity that most people and jobs aren’t given. I mean, it really was an anomaly. I now know was quite an anomaly. So, it’s hard for me to judge to say, “Well, why don’t you just do this?” Because most people don’t get that same opportunity.

 

Maryann Lombardi:

Yeah, absolutely. And I think for me, every job I’ve ever had was one, either I created or somebody created for me, because when I started out, I didn’t know how the heck to get a job, right? Like, I just didn’t really understand that wasn’t anything you were taught. And I was an artist and creative, and I was like entrepreneurial by nature, and that’s what my parents really like promoted, right? Like they promoted you can do and be whatever you want to be, but you have to do something. They didn’t tell you what. So, and there were, you know, blessings and cursed to this, but they said–

 

Erin Marcus:

It’s so wide open for the teenage mind.

 

Maryann Lombardi:

It’s way wide open, right? But it was very clear that you had to do something. There was no excuse for nothing. And so, it bred an ambitious and creative entrepreneurial minded individual in me. And so, when I got out in the working world, I was like, “Well, I don’t know how to get a normal job. So, I’m just going to make up some shit.” And so, I started creating jobs and started building a business. I mean, my first real job was a business of my own. So, I had that sort of sense already to learn how to do that. And as I grew up and as my life became more complicated, I learned how to do that with inside other institutions, right? So, like be in an environment and be like, “Okay. Well, this is what’s going on. This is the market gap. This is how I can fill that market gap, and this is the person who will pay me to do that thing.”

 

Erin Marcus:

Right. And what you’re describing is very much what I think what I benefit from as well. When I look back, the reason I was so successful in my last venture in corporate was I truly was being allowed to be an entrepreneur within the business. 

 

Maryann Lombardi:

Correct. Yeah, absolutely. Absolutely. And I think that’s its own skill, right? And it brings me back to the idea that entrepreneurship is the key. Right? Whether or not you are, and that is the future, right. Whether you’re thinking or doing entrepreneurship, it is a mindset as well as it is an action. Like if you are an entrepreneur, then you may have a business, but having an entrepreneurial mindset is the key to the future, right? The future is going to be about agility. The future is going to be, is, I shouldn’t say going to, I say is, is about agility, is about being able to see what’s going on and adapt to changes in markets and in changes in economy and in companies and growth and scale. So, creativity matters.

 

Erin Marcus:

And it’s so interesting for me to hear you say that because one, I hundred percent agree that the more agile you are, the more aware of the market you are, the more successful you’ll be as a company or an entrepreneur. The thing that I define as entrepreneurial, one of the key traits that I define as entrepreneurial is, in my opinion, a key trait that is massively lacking and going to cause big problems, and that’s the personal responsibility aspect. To me, the reason I was so successful, the reason I was allowed to be so entrepreneurial is I delivered and I didn’t blame anyone else for when it didn’t happen. I went above and beyond and did what I needed to do to prove ahead of time that I was the trustworthy and competent, and then I was rewarded with more rope to hang myself with, right? It creates the increasing bandwidth. But what I’m watching that is going to be a hiccup for so many people is the blaming of everyone else for everything that’s wrong, and waiting for someone to hand them something. I saw this in corporate before I left, that an increasingly amount of people would say, “Well, once I get a raise, then I’ll do XYZ.” 

 

Maryann Lombardi:

Yeah. Well, yeah. No, I mean, anytime it is if then you’re shit out of luck, right? 

 

Erin Marcus:

And I’m not talking about the abuse you see go on and the crappy behavior by bosses and managers, not acceptable. But in a good working environment, in a healthy working environment, you have to earn your stripes, you know.

 

Maryann Lombardi:

Yeah. And I think that often people don’t understand how to measure their results in the first place. Right? And so, I think that when you’re working for yourself or when you are kind of brought up in this entrepreneurial space, how do you know you’ve done right or well, right? You have to figure out what success looks like. You have to understand what the measure of success is, what your results are. And I think that for me and possibly for you, this sense of always understanding what the outcome looks like, what that success looks like, and be able to either get there or not get there and recognize, ‘Well, okay. If I didn’t get there, how do I need to adjust in order to get there?’ And being able to be transparent about that. I also think for me, because I totally understand where you’re coming from in that sense. And for me, it was also an efficiency issue, right? It was like, I just don’t have time to go through the bullshit of being like who’s fault and who’s whatever, and all of that kind of stuff. I just want to get it done.

 

Erin Marcus:

Solve the problem, yes. 

 

Maryann Lombardi:

Totally just get it done. 

 

Erin Marcus:

It’s over. It didn’t work. How do we move forward?

 

Maryann Lombardi:

Right. Right. And I also think context is different than blame, because I know for someone like me who has a feminist approach to the work that I do, context matters. Like understanding why you may have self-limiting beliefs and doubt and why it’s hard to do XYZ and why the market is not really open to you. The context of what’s happening really matters. The context is never an excuse for you not to take action and go build the dream that you want to build, but it is necessary to know it because it allows you to navigate the environment and the culture that you’re in, in a drastically different way.

 

Erin Marcus:

Totally. Absolutely. I think that’s one of the positive changes that we’re going to see. The status quo is fighting against it a bit. You’re seeing that backlash because change is scary, I understand that. But one of the amazing attributes younger generations have brought with them is an openness and a willingness to have those discussions, to recognize reality, to see where we’re not treating each other fairly. Not as opposed to just saying, “Oh, well it’s your fault.” I don’t know if you know this. So, I went to Chicago public schools in the 70s and 80s. And my brother and I counted once. I believe I went to school with people from 22 different countries. And we didn’t realize what a gift that was. And we also didn’t realize what an anomaly that was.

 

Maryann Lombardi:

Yeah.

 

Erin Marcus:

Until now when we go back together for our umpteenth reunions and we realize we got out in the world and realize nobody else had that experience.

 

Maryann Lombardi:

Yeah. Yeah. I think that’s absolutely true. I think about that with my own child because one of the interesting things is they were looking at colleges is that they’re like, wow, the college experience is a very homogenized environment. Right? And for them growing up in DC public schools, at least for most of their life, that is not their experience. 

 

Erin Marcus:

That was my thing like it was all the same people, a hundred percent.

 

Maryann Lombardi:

Right. So, it’s been interesting for them sort of thinking about what does that mean now for the way I interact and the people that I’m around and the community that surrounds me. How do I make sure that I have a diverse by thought look, belief, all of that kind of stuff around me when it doesn’t happen naturally.

 

Erin Marcus:

And it’s hard. It’s hard. I find that as I’ve gotten older in different places that I’ve lived, have been much more homogenous than what I grew up in. And it just seems to happen by default.

 

Maryann Lombardi:

Yeah. The other thing that I love about this generation is that their interest and understanding of themselves. Because this is the other thing that they have a choice of their own identity. We’re from the same generation and you just are what you are. And there is no choice about that. Right? And I know for me, when my child came out as non-binary, one of the things that I had to address was the fact that I was now no longer a mother of a daughter because they did not identify with a gender they were assigned at birth. And it set me down this massive rabbit hole of going, “Oh, oh, wait a second, shit.” If that can be–

 

Erin Marcus:

That’s not who I am, then who am I?

 

Maryann Lombardi:

Well, and why does it matter? Like, this is the question that kept sticking in my head. It’s like, why does it matter that I am now no longer that? But the narrative that I had told myself was like that was a huge piece of my identity. Right? And so, I had to unpack all of that kind of stuff. And I think that often we don’t do that work now. Like we just as adults not only have the opportunity, but also don’t think of doing it. And so, I am really, really thankful that I had the opportunity to actually unpack some of that shit. And I ended up writing a book about it too, because once that question I unpacked it, I like went down the rabbit hole of like, ‘Hmm, well, I’m also a woman. Why am I a woman? I don’t know. I just take that for granted. So, let me unpack that.’ And I was. Right? Exactly. So, I didn’t think that was something that you could change. So, I think that it’s incredibly important to understand what your personal narratives are and what you tell yourself about who you are because that defines what you think you can do. And this ends up coming up in my work all the time, because again, we’re building businesses that serve your life as opposed to you working at having a life at the altar of your work. Right? So, you need to have a sense of what you want.

 

Erin Marcus:

Loving what you’re learning here and interested in more? Check out our free Facebook group and join us at Conquer Your Business Community to find even more tips and tools designed to help you get out of reaction mode and into conquering your own business.

 

Erin Marcus:

So, when you work with your clients, and I know because of your previous experiences, you have a thing to compare it to. What are you finding is a unique challenge or maybe there isn’t one to your clientele versus someone who just doesn’t have an inkling or any frame of reference for that kind of challenge?

 

Maryann Lombardi:

Yeah. So, I think most of the time one of the biggest challenges is well, confidence is key, right? And without confidence, clarity is really hard to come by. And so, there is this marriage and this intersection between confidence and clarity. And so, I think often with a lot of my clients, we end up getting to clarity by working through their confidence levels too. And part of that is about that personal narrative. And it’s an interesting dynamic because I’m a business coach. I am flat out a business coach. What I want is I want you to have a successful, profitable business. But to do that and to do it well and sustainably, we’re going to touch on your life, right? Like, you’re going to do some backend coaching about who you are and what you want and all that kind of stuff. It’s inevitable to do that. 

 

Erin Marcus:

And I am the same way. The way that I describe it in my business is I work at the intersection where what you need to do meets who you need to be to do it. Because as a business coach, what I found out very quickly is the plan doesn’t matter if you can’t do the plan. If your fears and stories are limiting what you’re willing to do or what limit what you think is possible, then the plan doesn’t matter.

 

Maryann Lombardi:

Yeah. This is so true. That’s so true. And the other thing that ends up happening often with clients that I have is that they think that their tactics and their strategy is their business. And so, they’re buried in tactics and like this action and that action, and they’re burning themselves out because they’re just doing, doing, doing, doing, doing. When if they just rolled it back, right? Like we roll it back and we get back to that foundational stuff and we do, what are your values? What are your vision? What’s the who, what, why, the damn thing? Like all of this kind of stuff. And once they solidify that, strategy and tactics are bam. Right?

 

Erin Marcus:

It becomes easy. 

 

Maryann Lombardi:

Yeah. It becomes easy. And sometimes people have been in business for four or five years, they’re like, “Well, I know what I’m doing.” And I’m like, “Well, but you’re, you’re not making sales, your marketing isn’t working. You’re not connecting. You’ve hit a plateau. Maybe, just maybe those things aren’t really in alignment with the client and we know that stuff.

 

Erin Marcus:

The hustle will get you 100k, right. If you work hard enough, you can be out of alignment and not really good at what you’re doing. But if you do it enough, if you take enough action, you’ll usually be able to do something. But you’re a hundred percent right, if you want to actually grow your business, if you want to have a business that’s not driving you into the ground, if you want to have a business that’s not driving you to drink, it takes a lot more alignment. I call it the work before you do the work.

 

Maryann Lombardi:

Yeah. And it goes back to that efficiency thing, right? Like, I don’t want to waste my time. I don’t want to burn myself out. I don’t want to waste my time. I got a lot of shit I want to do in my life. And what I don’t want to be doing is I don’t want to be sleeping three hours a night because I’m stressed about XYZ because I have to work 12 hours the next day. That’s just not the kind of life I want to lead. And that’s not the kind of life that my clients usually want to lead, even if they’re in that life right now. So, it’s just inefficient to not do the work before that you do the work, like you’re saying. 

 

Erin Marcus:

And so, it’s hard. People don’t like doing that because not that they don’t like doing that, it’s not the fun part of their business. It’s not why they went into business. They want to go do the thing that the business does, but we don’t get to do the thing that the business does until you figure out how to have a business.

 

Maryann Lombardi:

Yeah. But even the thing that the business does is built off of those foundations, right? The thing the business does is not reals. Those are not the thing the business does.

 

Erin Marcus:

That’s not what the business does. 

 

Maryann Lombardi:

So, it’s just a shift in mindset and understanding that your foundations are the sexy part, right? I get the tactics seem the sexy part, but your foundations are the sexy part.

 

Erin Marcus:

That’s because the person selling the tactics is good at marketing.

 

Maryann Lombardi:

Yeah. They’re damn good at their job.

 

Erin Marcus:

All right. So, let’s lessen some people’s learning curves here. I love doing this because as an entrepreneur, we’re seeing different levels of success. One of the things I can do to give back is tell you, if you don’t do what I did, you’ll be lightyears ahead. Right? If you do nothing else, don’t do this thing. So, I love lessening that learning curve because it’s true in marketing, you have to put your best self out there. If you don’t show up as the person people think can solve their problem, why would they hire you? That being said, the dirty underbelly of, we don’t want to wallow in the chaos, but what are some things that you have found that you have tried totally failed, totally didn’t work? And what did you learn from it that we can share with some people?

 

Maryann Lombardi:

Yeah. Well, I would think in one sense is not asking for help. I think that’s a huge one. And I’m going to make a gross generalization here, but women are the worst at it. Women are just not really good at asking for help. And asking for help is key because not only do you learn things from that, but you make connections from that. And again, you lessen your time it takes you to get to the outcome that you’re looking for by doing that. So, really being able to let down that guard and let down the vulnerability of not knowing the answer to something I think exponentially moves you forward faster. And as somebody who’s a recovering not ask for helper, like, whatever, I don’t know what you call that. 

 

Erin Marcus:

Now, it’s a thing. 

 

Maryann Lombardi:

Now, it’s a thing, right? And not asking for help, because I do think that’s a huge, huge problem.

 

Erin Marcus:

I a hundred percent agree with you. And I think going back to what you’re talking about earlier about their self-definition, what do you think is possible and who are you, knowing who you are, if your business is tied to your worth as a human, you’re not going to ask for help.

 

Maryann Lombardi:

Yeah, absolutely. It’s the same thing. It always begs me so much when I hear people use that phrase of charge what you’re worth, which I hate that phrase, because you are not charging what you’re worth because you are worth–

 

Erin Marcus:

Are invaluable, right.

 

Maryann Lombardi:

Right. You are just valuable because you are. It doesn’t matter how much you make. It doesn’t matter what you do. You are just worthy. Right? Charge what you need to charge to live the life you want to live and that the market will bear. It’s a math equation. It’s this equation between what do you want at the end that’s profit and what does the market allow you to do? And then you marry those two things. It’s not about worth, it’s about math.

 

Erin Marcus:

And it’s funny because I tell people in the beginning, it’s not even a math question. In the beginning, it’s a gut question. Charge the amount that you can ask without passing out and that you won’t be resentful of your clients if they say yes. And then we’ll work up from there.

 

Maryann Lombardi:

And then we’ll work it on up from there.

 

Erin Marcus:

Well, we just got to get, we’ll last to get money. We got to get the ball rolling and we’ll just go up from there.

 

Maryann Lombardi:

Yeah. No, that’s great. And then I would add on it, double it. Right? 

 

Erin Marcus:

And then double it, exactly. 

 

Maryann Lombardi:

Because you’re always going to undercut yourself.

 

Erin Marcus:

You are. It’s, it’s brutal. I mean, I understand family incentivized you. What have you found with this niche? What led you here? Because it’s an interesting niche. Truthfully, and this is going to sound weird, I grew up immersed in the gay culture in Chicago to some extent because my mother was a hairdresser. And so, in that time, in the 70s, that was a very common when things were not wide open for people who were out, that was one of the few places that they were accepted. So, I grew up surrounded by people who identify differently as norm given definition. Chicago is a very good place for people with a variety of different cultures and choices in life because of the diversity here. But normally, not a hundred percent, but normally that group of people are usually best served by that group of people. They feel safer, right? How are you finding that almost as an outsider, right?

 

Maryann Lombardi:

Yeah. No, absolutely. Well, there are two things in my life that led me to this work. One of them is that when I got divorced, there was a moment after my kid was born where I was like sitting in the grass playing with them and all this kind of stuff. And I was looking at them and I was working so hard to be present. I mean, it was exhausting to be present with them. And I sat there and in that moment, I was like, “This is fucked.” I was like, “This is not the way it’s supposed to be. It is not supposed to be this much work to be sitting here present with my child. And it was sort of like this moment of realization that all of the crap that was happening in my failing marriage was made it so I couldn’t even be present with the thing that was the most exciting part of my life happening in that moment, right? And so, right then and there, I go, “Oh, shit. I need to make a change. Like I got to change some stuff.” And I totally rebuilt my life from there. And that, that was one of those things where it immediately put life at the top and everything else underneath it. And there’s a lot of struggle that comes with it. But from that perspective, it really anchored in. This is how you do it, right? My own experience, you have to have life first and then build it out from there. And then I’m going to get to the answer of your question. And then the other big moment was this second coming out of my kid, like of their identity. And one of the amazing things that happened there was to watch them do the exact same thing in the power of that. And then me being this passenger on a journey of learning through their eyes, through their experience and all of that kind of stuff, how I can be a better support of them. So, most–

 

Erin Marcus:

How old were they when they made an abrupt announcement as I mean, versus what they had to go through before they shared?

 

Maryann Lombardi:

Yeah, that announcement was at like 14, 15 area. Yeah. And so–

 

Erin Marcus:

14 to begin with.

 

Maryann Lombardi:

Right. From the perspective of who I serve, most of my clientele identify as women because that tends to be the primary group of individuals that I support. But often because of the amount of networks that I have been in and the conversations that I’ve had around being the parent of a trans kid just supporting the other kids that my child knows from supporting businesses that support, I find clients who also identify in different ways. It’s not necessarily that I think that I’m the best person to serve an individual who may want to be served by somebody who has more direct firsthand experience with their identity. I think that’s rock solid, great. But I want to be as open as I can be for the journey that any entrepreneur is on. And sometimes that means that I have the luxury of being able to serve individuals who are gender nonconforming. I think that’s awesome for the entire community that I’m serving because we are all the same in many ways. And then we are all drastically different than others. And like your upbringing, the more we are around each other, I think the better off we all are.

 

Erin Marcus:

A hundred percent. A hundred percent. Like I go back to what I said, we didn’t realize what a gift that was until much, much later. Right? The gift of knowing that people are just people.

 

Maryann Lombardi:

Yeah. And I also like to call out the fact that there are gender nonconforming entrepreneurs out there that we all should be serving. So, it’s part of the reason why I also say women and non-binary entrepreneurs, because not everybody is one thing. Right? And I think sometimes when we don’t name it, people don’t feel welcome. And so, even the act of naming, “Please, come on down, enter the conversation. How can I serve you? How can I learn what I don’t know? Where can I serve you better?” All of those kind of things are a part of it, but naming it is important.

 

Erin Marcus:

Oh, absolutely. Absolutely. And one of the things, like you hear all the time, representation is important because you cannot become what you don’t know it’s possible to become. Right? It doesn’t work. You cannot become what your subconscious doesn’t know is possible to become.

 

Maryann Lombardi:

Absolutely.

 

Erin Marcus:

So, if people want to continue this conversation with you, and I highly recommend that they continue this conversation with you, what is the best way for them to get ahold of you?

 

Maryann Lombardi:

Yeah. LinkedIn, it is by far the best way to get ahold of me. So, please jump on in, connect with me there, DM me, I will absolutely respond and let’s talk and get on a call. And get on a call just to get to know each other, right? Like, I mean, I’m a networking freak. I love it. I love talking to people. I love their stories and why and how they do what they do. So, just jump on in, let’s hop on a call and get to know each other and see where it goes from there.

 

Erin Marcus:

Awesome. I just finished a conversation with somebody and we both said that if you don’t truly love people with an honest nonjudgmental curiosity, it’s going to be hard to be successful in a service-based industry.

 

Maryann Lombardi:

No doubt. Absolutely.

 

Erin Marcus:

Well, I highly recommend they connect with you. We will put all the links in the show notes to make sure to make that easy. Thank you for sharing more of your story with me. Now, I’m excited I got to know more about you and I can’t wait to see what’s next for you.

 

Maryann Lombardi:

I appreciate that. Thanks for having me on.

 

Erin Marcus:

I hope you enjoyed this episode of the Ready Yet?! podcast. I truly enjoy bringing these stories of success and inspiration to you. Please join us in our mission to empower entrepreneurs to be in charge of their businesses and in charge of their lives by sharing this with anyone you know who would benefit from our tactical and motivating advice, leaving us a review and letting us know if there are any particular topics you would really appreciate hearing about. See you next time.

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