EPISODE 121 INTERVIEW WITH NICOLE BROADHURST: WORKING WITH INTENTION IN YOUR BUSINESS

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EPISODE 121 INTERVIEW WITH NICOLE BROADHURST: WORKING WITH INTENTION IN YOUR BUSINESS

WORKING WITH INTENTION IN YOUR BUSINESS

In the corporate world, often our work just comes to us in some way, shape, or form.  As a business owner, we have to be much more laser-focused with our intentions or else the work can get off track very quickly.  Nicole Broadhurst is here to share her story of leaving a job that no longer suited her life, starting her business, and fine-tuning that business so that work continues to “fill her cup.” I hope you enjoy hearing two women laugh a lot, because Nicole and I were definitely having some fun! 

Resources

Transcript

Erin Marcus:

Hi! I’m Erin Marcus, former corporate executive turned entrepreneur and founder and CEO of Conquer Your Business. Welcome to the Ready Yet?! Podcast. We’re excited to bring you more than a hundred episodes of interviews and insights designed to help entrepreneurs get the financial and emotional freedom they need in order to build a business and a life they’re proud of.

Welcome to this episode of the Ready Yet?! Podcast. We could have been recording for the last hour as my guest and I today have shared the, what I’m calling this summer of trauma and all sorts of stories about what it takes, what does it take, who do you need to be in order to be a successful entrepreneur, and how that journey is so unorganized and so messy no matter how hard you tried. But here’s the deal, so today, I want to welcome Nicole Broadhurst to my platform because I met Nicole in a program that I’m involved in. Actually, no, because I didn’t realize you were in the program, and I came and spoke at the conference you were attending, and you came running up to me and you knew some of the references that I made and we’re like, ‘Oh my God. It’s one of me. It’s one of my peoples.’ And so, we’ve just gone on from there. So, before we get into what’s only going to be a comical conversation of the living hell is entrepreneurship. Why don’t you give everybody a little bit of a more formal introduction to who you are and what you do that we can talk about why we do any of this?

 

Nicole Broadhurst:

I know, I know. Well, yeah, if we knew that. Anyway. Hi, Erin. Super excited to be here with you. I always enjoy our conversation, so I’m super excited that we have the opportunity to record this one. My name’s Nicole Broadhurst. I’m a former healthcare administrator, turned independent patient advocate. I help patients and families maintain work-life balance without the frustration of medical billing departments. So, I manage medical bills. That’s what I do.

 

Erin Marcus:

So, here’s why I particularly love the field that you’re in. My background, my corporate background was in long-term care insurance. My first venture into entrepreneurship was in the franchise world, working with families with aging parents. And you just get immersed in the chaos that is that part of someone’s life. I have a litany of medical issues and situations we could go on about, but the billing, you know, all of those things are unfortunately horrific to navigate, even if you’re smart, even if you’re organized, even if you have your ducks in a row. So, I do have a particular fondness for what it is that you help people

 

Nicole Broadhurst:

Yeah. I feel like that lift is so helpful because I feel like it’s ethically wrong for us as a society to burden people with the financial stress and frustration while they’re trying to be physically healthy. And so, I love doing that. 

 

Erin Marcus:

So, question, you mentioned what you did before and what you did now. How, why did you decide to take that jump off the cliff into entrepreneurship?

 

Nicole Broadhurst:

Yeah. So, it’s funny that you asked that. I actually started thinking about entrepreneurship about 20 years before I actually did it.

 

Erin Marcus:

Okay. In my defense, it only took me two. I don’t know. 

 

Nicole Broadhurst:

Yeah. So, first and foremost, I do not come from an entrepreneurial world. Like when I think about growing up and my exposure, I was not exposed to anyone that owned their own business, did their own thing. I grew up in a very blue collar, factory oriented community. And so, really, I was in my mid to late twenties before it even occurred to me that, “Well, maybe I could do something like that.” You know? And then there was all of the logistics of life. I was a single mom and I had to, you know, all of the things. And the timing didn’t work out until later. But it was there and it was a planted seed. And quite frankly, what actually ended up happening was, I’d been thinking about this for a long time, and I knew that I could stay in my role, make good money and continue to bang my forehead on a brick wall or I could, and I know you’ve heard this like the pain of staying the same finally became greater than the pain of the unknown. Right? Like I was just like, ‘Okay. This sucks and it sucks so bad.’

 

Erin Marcus:

I can’t do this one more time. 

 

Nicole Broadhurst:

That’s right. I cannot do this one more day. I remember the day I came home from work and was in tears, and I said to my husband, I said, “I can’t do this anymore.” And at the time, there was a new regulation in healthcare in the state that I was in. And I knew that as an administrator, there was no way that I could enforce compliance in my agency.

 

Erin Marcus:

We had that in Illinois where different rules came down that the hospitals were like, ‘There’s no way to do this.’

 

Nicole Broadhurst:

Right. It’s just impossible. And so, when I came home from work that day, I suck. You know, it just takes the AG, the Attorney General, right? The Attorney General, I’m going to make an example and I’m going to throw the dart and wherever it lands, that’s who I’m going to make an example of. And I had been in the industry a long time, and I had a great reputation, and I was good at what I did. And that threat was terrifying because if my agency came up, I was it. I was the target. And I just decided it was too risky for me, and I would rather step over here into entrepreneurship having no idea what that really meant. 

 

Erin Marcus:

One of my things I hold very, very true is how grateful I am that I didn’t know what I didn’t know.

 

Nicole Broadhurst:

Right.

 

Erin Marcus:

Because if I knew it, I don’t know that I ever would’ve tried.

 

Nicole Broadhurst:

You know, I think you’re onto something, Erin.  

 

Erin Marcus:

I’m not that dumb. Right? If I knew ahead of time what was going to happen, I probably wouldn’t have done it, right? So, I was very grateful that I just didn’t know.

 

Nicole Broadhurst:

Right. Yeah. So, I just don’t know, like now, like it’s just, “Oh, this is what I do.” 

 

Erin Marcus:

Now, it’s too late. Right. I’m completely unemployable. I listen to other people talk about work and went I can’t do that.

 

Nicole Broadhurst:

Yeah, no, no, I can’t do that anymore. Yeah. I love and I think a lot of it is too, right? We get to do the things that we love, like at the core of what I get to do every day, right? In the core of what I do every day, I love what I do. I love the moments where I get, ‘Oh my gosh, I got an email this morning from a client that said, “Omg, thank you, thank you, thank you. This was the best money I’ve ever spent.” Okay. 

 

Erin Marcus:

And I got great accolades in my corporate job. But I think there’s just something different. One of the reasons I left corporate, I mean, I knew there was something more out there for me. I was restless, probably age related, but I felt like I was getting too far removed from making a difference. Like, I don’t even know how to describe it. The only word that ever comes to mind is contrived. That I worked with amazing people. I got really to have some amazing experiences, but at the end of the day, the work was created just to have more work. And I felt too far removed from having an impact on it for anybody.

 

Nicole Broadhurst:

Right. And in that one-on-one, I love what you said, that direct impact.

 

Erin Marcus:

Direct way. Yeah.

 

Nicole Broadhurst:

Yeah. I agree. There were times, I think back when I first started thinking about doing this work and how it came to me, because I got to spend time with families in my office in an intimate, conversational way. And since you mentioned that, I’m like, yeah, because when I left corporate, I didn’t have any families coming in to talk to me. You know what I mean? When you said that, I was like, “Yes.” 

 

Erin Marcus:

The farther you move up the ladder, the more removed you are from the outcome of what you’re doing.

 

Nicole Broadhurst:

Yeah. And not where–yes. So, I couldn’t agree with that more that there is that–

 

Erin Marcus:

So, did you have a plan? So, you came home–I did not. I thought I had a plan. I thought I had a plan. Having a plan and thinking I have a plan to completely new. I talked to people who are like, “Oh, I saved for two years, and I worked part-time,” and I did the opposite. I’m like, “I’m out.” Right?

 

Nicole Broadhurst:

So, yeah. So, great question. Yeah. So, I want to say, “Oh, yeah, I planned,” but I didn’t. You know what I really did when I quit, when I gave my notice and I quit working? I went on like this, I called it my sabbatical like I went six months. 

 

Erin Marcus:

It sounds so much better than unemployed. 

 

Nicole Broadhurst:

That’s right. Don’t tell all the secrets, Erin. 

 

Erin Marcus:

I quit my job and I don’t have a job.

 

Nicole Broadhurst:

So, I’m in sabbatical. It’s a sabbatical. But what I did, I actually spent time in art therapy. I worked with latex paints and I did paint pouring, and I did mix media art. I was terrible at it. I won’t even show you anything that I did, but I was just so burnt in everything that I just couldn’t do anything. I crocheted. I learned to crochet.

 

Erin Marcus:

You want to hear it? That’s awesome. You want to hear my version of what happened?

 

Nicole Broadhurst:

Yes, I do. 

 

Erin Marcus:

Same but completely different. So, I did leave corporate having purchased a franchise.

 

Nicole Broadhurst:

Yes.

 

Erin Marcus:

But I was so overwhelmed and lost that I knew I needed to do something unrelated to anything that I had ever done as a complete break, something that would not allow my mind to wander while doing it, because I was already not sleeping. I was already on overdrive. So, at 40 years old, I decided to learn how to become a figure skater.

 

Nicole Broadhurst:

Are you serious?

 

Erin Marcus:

Swear to God.

 

Nicole Broadhurst:

Wow. I thought my art was kind of crazy.

 

Erin Marcus:

By the end of that year, I had flown across the country to compete in an adult where I won a blue ribbon first place in an adult skating competition.

 

Nicole Broadhurst:

This is fantastic.

 

Erin Marcus:

With the 90-second choreograph routine.

 

Nicole Broadhurst:

Oh my gosh.

 

Erin Marcus:

Landslide by Fleetwood Mac. That’s it. That’s what I did. That was my bridge. That was my, I will tell you when you’re already 40 years old, you can’t not concentrate on your feet because you’re going to die. There was no way my mind was wandering.

 

Nicole Broadhurst:

Oh my God, that is great.

 

Erin Marcus:

That’s the thing, because it was–like what you did was extremely therapeutic. What I did was just arsenide. 

 

Nicole Broadhurst:

No, I think it was cool. I think it’s a testament to when–

 

Erin Marcus:

I have a video.

 

Nicole Broadhurst:

Oh my God, that is amazing.

 

Erin Marcus:

I have a really cute picture. I did the sprinkles and the scrunchy and the hair. 

 

Nicole Broadhurst:

The whole nine yards. You did it all. 

 

Erin Marcus:

The whole nine yards. Yeah.

 

Nicole Broadhurst:

I think that that is so wonderful. And I think it’s a huge testament too, allowing us to create that bridge because it’s really important. Right? I mean, I found that, like, I look back on it and look at this bookmark thing that I did, or like, look at this little thing that I did. But I tell you, it really did allow me to, to prepare my mind and everything for entrepreneurship. Like to actually make that change.

 

Erin Marcus:

I talk about it now as, what do you do to fill your cup? I volunteer on Fridays at a wildlife rescue. Now, I’m more intentionally filling my cup. I understand more now, what I did by accident was do something that let my mind stop.

 

Nicole Broadhurst:

Right.

 

Erin Marcus:

Right? I mean, I just scared the crap out of myself in a completely different way, but hey, it’s me. 



Nicole Broadhurst:

But it served the purpose. 

 

Erin Marcus:

It served the purpose. And I think that’s important because you can only handle the stress to some extent before you forget the physical manifestation and the problems of it.

 

Nicole Broadhurst:

Right.

 

Erin Marcus:

You can’t maintain that.

 

Nicole Broadhurst:

No, I agree. And it is important to remember what do I do? I love what you said, what do I do to fill my cup? Because if I allow my mind, and I know that you’ll relate to this, if I allow my mind to just do what it does, I will be–

 

Erin Marcus:

No good can come of that. 

 

Nicole Broadhurst:

None. Zip, zero, zilch. Like not productive, not helpful.

 

Erin Marcus:

But that’s a really point because I think in entrepreneurship, one of the things I have learned versus corporate versus having a job, and we’re talking, we had very good careers and very good situations. We were very accomplished. However, one of the things I know about entrepreneurship is how much more intention is required around everything. Right?

 

Nicole Broadhurst:

Yeah. Say that again. 

 

Erin Marcus:

You can’t do this in reaction mode. And a lot of times at work, in corporate, you’re in reaction mode because someone else has laid the path, someone else has done the thing, and you’re doing as best you can in that path. But as an entrepreneur, you have to be in attention all the time.

Loving what you’re learning here and interested in more? Check out our free Facebook group and join us at Conquer Your Business Community to find even more tips and tools designed to help you get out of reaction mode and into conquering your own business.

 

Nicole Broadhurst:

I love that you just said that because I just had this realization just this week about the fourth quarter of this year and how it’s really kind of hard. It’s a challenge to stop today and be thinking three or four months from now. Like an understanding that what I do today is leading that.

 

Erin Marcus:

It’s so funny that you brought it up that way because I just did a strategic advisory call for my clients this morning because the truth of the matter is the fourth quarter sets this stage for next year. I called this the holy crap time of year because in corporate, you start planning for the next year in October. You don’t wait till January. And this is the holy crap time of year because the beginning of the year is wide open. Anything could happen. New Year’s resolution, you know? And then I’ve got all the time in the world to do whatever the thing is that I want to do this year. And then it becomes May, and now you’re like, “Oh, it’s summer.” And the whole world slows down this year. I think the world just came to a screeching stop in July. And then all of a sudden, the kids go back to school. The sun goes down before 9:00 PM and we all go, ‘What the hell, I’ve only got three months till Christmas, toll Holiday break. What happened to everything I said I wanted to do in January? Holy crap. I better figure something out.’

 

Nicole Broadhurst:

I better figure something out.

 

Erin Marcus:

I find year over year; I’ve had people buy from me in the fourth quarter that have said no to me all year. I get more of my private clients in the fourth quarter than I get all year. Because of how weird humans are with time.

 

Nicole Broadhurst:

Yeah. We are weird with time. 

 

Erin Marcus:

And it’s because they’re not working with intention. They’re working in reaction.

 

Nicole Broadhurst:

That’s right. It’s so true, Erin. So true. So, I don’t know about you, but I like blocked time on my calendar for that. You know, like that stuff, Right? Because I have to. It’s so funny. I think I shared with you before we started recording this, that I had a service line that I was going to launch. I was planning it, I’ve been planning it all third quarter. Like, okay, in fourth quarter we’re going to launch this, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah. And the funniest thing happened organically and authentically this week like I opened my mouth and it launched. Like literally opened my mouth and it just launched. And I was like–

 

Erin Marcus:

Where did that come from? Who was in there? Where did that come from?

 

Nicole Broadhurst:

Well, I guess, you know, the plan was to launch it in in fourth quarter. So, we’re a little bit early, but not bad. Right?

 

Erin Marcus:

Yeah. And I know the story of what you’ve launched, and I do want to get into that a little bit about iterations of a business. Iterations of a business. I’ve had iterations based on failure, iterations based on divine download, which is often a failure. Right? 

 

Nicole Broadhurst:

But you never know if you don’t try. 

 

Erin Marcus:

You never know. What I tell people, people underestimate the amount of action they have to take. So, what have you found is your iteration process natural? Like you do this thing for a living and now you’re launching a way to teach other people how to do the thing that you have done so well for a living, which I absolutely, absolutely love. Because those things are, you know, so you do medical billing and now you’re going to teach other professionals how to be billing advocates, which is such a great–I don’t know about you, but if somebody’s going to be fixing my medical billing problem, I wanted to be the woman who also teaches the other people how to do it. This is a fantastic credential for each other.

 

Nicole Broadhurst:

Yeah, for sure. Yeah. So, yeah. So, it’s funny, I love, because that’s not anywhere near what I expected to have happened. So, wouldn’t you ask me originally about my plan? Oh, I had a beautiful plan when I originally started. It is nothing like on the refrigerator.

 

Erin Marcus:

That’s right. You got a magnet on the refrigerator with my now grown child’s art from when he was in kindergarten. Got it. 

 

Nicole Broadhurst:

You got it. The best lead plans, like, I don’t know, I think that, you know, for me, so you ask about the iteration of things and how things like evolve for me and I can just share my experience. And really my experience is this is I’m doing this thing that I love and I’m really good at, and I am talking about it and I’m marketing it and I’m selling it. And it’s super easy to do because I love it. Like I can, you know, so when I used to hear people say, “Oh, what would you do for free that make?” And like, literally I say it that way because that’s how I heard it. I was like, you’re so full of crap. But you know what? They’re not.

 

Erin Marcus:

They’re not. 

 

Nicole Broadhurst:

They’re not. Like find the thing that I would do for free. Right? 

 

Erin Marcus:

I was doing this for free for years before I made it a business because I had a different business that did so well that all the people I was involved with said, “Screw that. Tell me how you’re growing your business.” And that’s great that you’re helping grandma, but how are you growing your business? And I would just help them because I love doing it.

 

Nicole Broadhurst:

Right, because it’s fun and it’s easy and it’s a real easy lift. We were talking about that too. I’ve branched out into some consulting work and oh my gosh, I love that. That’s like great, because it’s this nice easy lift for me and it’s a paycheck and it’s helping. And it’s–

 

Erin Marcus:

And the difference between, you know, there’s a few have to haves in order to make entrepreneurship work. And one of them I’ve been talking about lately is you have to have a nonjudgmental, honest curiosity, love for humans or you’re not going to make it in a service-based business. You’re going to be miserable. But the other thing is I have a hard time saying, ‘Turn your passion and in your job, and you’ll never work a day in your life,’ because the truth of matter is my passion will not earn me any money.

 

Nicole Broadhurst:

Right. Right.

 

Erin Marcus:

I volunteer at a wildlife rescue. So, one of the best pieces of advice came from a mentor that I worked with Larry Winget who said, and I’m going to screw up the way he said it better than what I’m thinking of it now, but find what it is that you’re absolutely fantastic at doing and exploit it in service to others.

 

Nicole Broadhurst:

That’s beautiful.

 

Erin Marcus:

Yeah.

 

Nicole Broadhurst:

Like that is beautiful.

Erin Marcus:

That’s when it’s easy. It doesn’t mean building a business that is easy. It doesn’t mean the mindset work is easy, but that’s why you have to be so in love with the things that you’re doing or the outcome you’re providing so that you can get through–

 

Nicole Broadhurst:

The summer of hell.

 

Erin Marcus:

Even the good things are traumatic. Right? But because I will tell you in the middle of this summer that has been monumentally stressful for really, really bad reasons and for really, really good reasons, just a lot going on, the days that I was with my group program clients were the–I just love being with them.

 

Nicole Broadhurst:

Oh, I love hearing that. 

 

Erin Marcus:

That was my break.

 

Nicole Broadhurst:

Yeah.

 

Erin Marcus:

My break was getting to help them and seeing them break through their things. Right? 

Nicole Broadhurst:

Yeah. I love that you just said that like it gave me goosebumps because this week when I was hanging out with my people on Wednesday, that’s what I said to them. This is like my favorite hour of the entire week is to get to hang out with you guys for this hour. It’s amazing. And here are all the wins and the things that they’re doing. Anyway, it’s yeah, it’s very cup filling, for sure.

 

Erin Marcus:

Right. And your journey through the muckety-muck of getting out of your own way to do what you have to do to technically and tactically grow the business. You can only be pulled forward by a desire that’s strong enough to matter. Right?

 

Nicole Broadhurst:

That’s right. That’s right, because otherwise it would crush, like I wouldn’t want to get out of bed. There it is.

 

Erin Marcus:

So, I’ll ask you one of my favorite questions to ask, because I’m a big fan of lessening people’s learning curves. Right? If all you do is don’t do what I did, you’re ahead of the game. Right?

 

Nicole Broadhurst:

Yes. Right. Don’t do that. Yes, yes, yes.

 

Erin Marcus:

And the other thing I love about asking this question, there’s not a single successful entrepreneur that I’ve ever asked this question to that couldn’t come up with 700 answers. They’re very glib about the fact that this is how this works. What have you done or not done that made it worse for you? Like abject failures. Don’t do it this way that that we can lessen somebody’s learning curve for them.

 

Nicole Broadhurst:

So, first and foremost for me is don’t wait. Don’t wait, don’t wait, don’t wait, don’t wait. I waited and waited and waited and that’s the biggest thing that I can think of is, man, if I had been doing this, if I had started this earlier, if I had started doing this, how many more people could I have helped? How much further along would I be? How much happier would some of those years have been? So, that would be my first one. Don’t wait, because there’s never–

 

Erin Marcus:

It’s like what they say about having kids, there’s never a right time.

 

Nicole Broadhurst:

Right, exactly. So, don’t wait. And then I think the other thing would be, I don’t know how to word this, don’t be afraid of not knowing. Like don’t be afraid of not knowing. I have totally learned in the last four or five years, there’s no reason to be fearful of what’s coming because there’s no way for me to know what’s coming. Like I just don’t know. And what I do know is that no matter what shows up, I’ll survive. 

 

Erin Marcus:

Well, it needs trust. I mean, you’ve built trust with yourself to know that even when bad things happen or things don’t work out, you can figure it out.

 

Nicole Broadhurst:

I love what you just said, when bad things happen or it’s a different outcome. One of my favorite sayings has become, I’m not responsible for outcomes. I’m only responsible for my effort and my attitude. And if I show up with my best effort and my best attitude, then the outcome is just the outcome.

 

Erin Marcus:

Well, right. And my version of that, and I think it was a Churchill quote, and it’s not nearly as lovely as yours is success is the ability to go from failure to failure with no lack of enthusiasm. 

 

Nicole Broadhurst:

I love it. And if there’s one thing we’ve got, Erin, it’s–

 

Erin Marcus:

I mean, seriously. 

 

Nicole Broadhurst:

Right? Yeah, that’s the attitude, the enthusiasm. Like bring it. Right? 

 

Erin Marcus:

Right. And you go through the bad things and you realize you didn’t die.

 

Nicole Broadhurst:

That’s right. Right.

 

Erin Marcus:

Sometimes it felt like it, but you go through the things and you figure it out. I know the way that you know, that what I can do for a client, I’m a hundred percent confident in. I have no hesitation on what I can do for my clients. You have no hesitation on what you can do for your clients. The unknown part is when we’re trying to do something new in an effort to grow the business. We launched a podcast. I didn’t know how–I have Zoom, a ring light and a microphone, and my assistant’s brother taught her how to use garage band so we can make it sound better. Ta-da! Our favorite saying between my assistant and I, and it’s off at TikTok. You can find these videos. Are we supposed to know what we’re doing? Okay. Just chucking.

 

Nicole Broadhurst:

I love that. 

Erin Marcus:

Now, you can’t help your clients that way. That piece I have covered, but I don’t wait until I’ve figured it all out before I start trying a new thing to grow my business. Because you’ll never figure. It will change your best, right?

 

Nicole Broadhurst:

Yeah. It will be different.

Erin Marcus:

The only way you can get better at a 90-second thing to landslide by Fleetwood Mac is by practicing doing it. Right? You can only get better at doing the thing by doing the thing. 

 

Nicole Broadhurst:

Doing it. Yes. Yes. Yeah. And just do it. 

 

Erin Marcus:

And it doesn’t matter if you have no idea what you’re doing, because you know what else? Someone else knows how. Just find one of them. 

 

Nicole Broadhurst:

Oh my gosh, I’m reading this great book and I’m going to plug the book, if you don’t mind. It’s called Who Not How.

 

Erin Marcus:

Oh, I just read it.

 

Nicole Broadhurst:

Oh my gosh. It is like, so you know? Yes, right?

 

Erin Marcus:

Who do you need to help you not how do you need to do the thing. When I was skating, here’s a perfect analogy, when I was learning how to skate, I couldn’t do most of the thing, right? No business. No business, zero business on the ice. But if my coach was skating in front of me, I could do it. He wouldn’t just stay in front of me. I’d be two feet behind him following him through the things, I could do 10 times more than when he sat and told me to go do the thing. Even though we had practiced it, I just–find the person who knows how to do the thing and follow in the path. 

 

Nicole Broadhurst:

That’s right. That’s right. Problem solved.

 

Erin Marcus:

Problem solved. There we go. I do know how to help you be better. All right. So, if people want to continue this conversation with you, and heaven knows why.

 

Nicole Broadhurst:

Because we’re cool people to hang out with, Erin. That’s why. 

 

Erin Marcus:

But seriously, what is the best way for people to find you?

 

Nicole Broadhurst:

I am on LinkedIn, Nicole Broadhurst. Look me up. Connect with me on LinkedIn. That’s where I live. That’s where I do all of my things. Love talking to people. Come hang out. Like we just have fun. 

 

Erin Marcus:

Come hang out. What could possibly go wrong?

 

Nicole Broadhurst:

Nothing. Nothing.

 

Erin Marcus:

Awesome. Well, thank you for sharing your insights, your story, your time. You know I love chatting with you. 

 

Nicole Broadhurst:

I do love it. I appreciate it.

 

Erin Marcus:

We’ve had a good time, but there is so much information that’s been packed in there. 



Nicole Broadhurst:

Yeah, love it. Thanks, Erin. 

 

Erin Marcus:

I hope you enjoyed this episode of the Ready Yet?! podcast. I truly enjoy bringing these stories of success and inspiration to you. Please join us in our mission to empower entrepreneurs to be in charge of their businesses and in charge of their lives by sharing this with anyone you know who would benefit from our tactical and motivating advice, leaving us a review and letting us know if there are any particular topics you would really appreciate hearing about. See you next time.

 

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